Category Archive News

TEMPORARY CHANGE TO OPENING HOURS from 25th March 2020

Due to the unfolding situation with Coronavirus (Covid-19) we need to let you know we’ll be temporarily changing our door opening hours.

From Wednesday 25th March 2020 the surgery doors will be closed 8am -1pm if you have been invited to the surgery by a clinician then please ring the door bell and a member of the team will open the doors for you. Or you require medical assistance please ring the bell.

We will open the surgery doors from 1:00 pm to 6:30 pm so that patients can come down to the surgery to collect sicknotes and test request forms.

From 25th March 2020 the Surgery telephone lines will be available from 8:00 am to 18:30 pm.

Like all GP Practices we’re going to have to change the way we work for a while to protect the health & wellbeing of everyone.

Prescription changes during COVID-19

Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic we are asking that we do not receive paper prescription requests.

Please request your medication via Patient access, My GP app, E-Consult or  you can email your requests to VRCCG.prescriptions.weaverhamsurgery@nhs.net

Also if you do not have a nominated pharmacy then please add a nominated pharmacy to your request.

Thank you.

How to get an isolation note for your employer

This service, at nhs.uk, is for those who have been told to stay at home because of coronavirus and you need a note for your employer.

This service is only for people who:

  • have symptoms of coronavirus and have used the 111 online coronavirus service
  • have been told by a healthcare professional they have symptoms of coronavirus
  • live with someone who has symptoms of coronavirus

If you are not sure if you need to stay at home, get the latest NHS advice on coronavirus.

If you have to stay at home but feel well enough to work, ask your employer if you can work from home. If you can work from home, you will not need an isolation note.

You can also use this service for someone else.

Get an isolation note.

Coronavirus – Latest Advice

The NHS in Cheshire and Public Health England (PHE) are well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to protect patients, our community and NHS staff while ensuring as many services as possible are available to the public.

If you have symptoms associated with coronavirus including a new continuous cough and a high temperature, you are advised to stay at home for 7 days.
Please do not book a GP appointment or attend your GP practice.

If you live with other people, they should stay at home for at least 14 days, to avoid spreading the infection outside the home. After 14 days, anyone you live with who does not have symptoms can return to their normal routine.
But, if anyone in your home gets symptoms, they should stay at home for 7 days from the day their symptoms start. Even if it means they’re at home for longer than 14 days. The most up-to-date public guidance is always online at www.nhs.uk/coronavirus.

If your symptoms are serious, or get worse, NHS 111 has an online coronavirus service that can tell you if you need further medical help and advise you what to do. 

Only call 111 direct if you are advised to do so by the online service or you cannot go online.

Novel Coronavirus – Important Advice for Returning Travellers

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people if you’ve travelled to the UK from the following places in the last 14 days, even if you do not have symptoms:

  • Iran
  • Hubei province in China
  • Special care zones in South Korea (Daegu, Cheongdo, Gyeongsan)

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people if you’ve travelled to the UK from the following places, even if you do not have symptoms:

  • Italy (since 09 March)

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people if you’ve travelled to the UK from the following places in the last 14 days and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath, even if your symptoms are mild:

  • mainland China outside of Hubei province
  • South Korea outside of the special care zones
  • Cambodia
  • Hong Kong
  • Japan
  • Laos
  • Macau
  • Malaysia
  • Myanmar
  • Singapore
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • Vietnam

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do next.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

Don’t miss the signs – Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

Over 7300 cases of Ovarian Cancer are diagnosed in the UK every year, but do you know what signs to look out for?

Ovarian cancer is the fourth most common form of cancer death in women, after breast lung and bowel cancer. But the average GP will see only one case of ovarian cancer every five years.

Most women are diagnosed once the cancer has already spread, which makes treatment more challenging.

The current five-year survival rate for ovarian cancer is 46 per cent. If diagnosed at the earliest stage, up to 90 per cent of women would survive five years or more3. This is why early diagnosis is so important.

What to look out for

Symptoms are frequent (they usually happen more than 12 times a month) and persistent, and include:

  • increased abdominal size/persistent bloating (not bloating that comes and goes)
  • difficulty eating/feeling full
  • pelvic or abdominal pain
  • needing to wee more urgently or more often

Other symptoms can include unexpected weight loss, change in bowel habits, and extreme fatigue.

If you regularly experience any of these symptoms, and that’s not normal for you, it’s important that you see your GP. It’s unlikely that your symptoms are caused by a serious problem, but it’s important that you get checked.

For further information, visit the Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month website.

Signs and Symptoms to look out for as soap character is diagnosed with Bowel Cancer

Any Emmerdale fans will have seen that one of their beloved characters, Vanessa Woodfield, has recently, as part of her storyline, been diagnosed with bowel cancer.

Storylines like these are a great way to raise awareness and highlight such important conditions, how they are diagnosed and how they are treated. However, it can also worry/panic some people, so below are the signs and symptoms you should look out for.

Bowel cancer is very treatable but the earlier its diagnosed, the easier it is to treat.

Symptoms can include:

  • Bleeding from your bottom and/or blood in your poo

There are several possible causes of bleeding from your bottom or blood in your bowel movements (poo). Bright red blood may come from swollen blood vessels (haemorrhoids or piles) in your back passage. It may also be caused by bowel cancer. Dark red or black blood may come from your bowel or stomach. Tell your doctor about any bleeding so they can find out what is causing it.

  • A persistent and unexplained change in bowel habit

Tell your GP if you have noticed any persistent and unexplained changes in your bowel habit, especially if you also have bleeding from your back passage. You may have looser poo and you may need to poo more often than normal. Or you may feel as though you’re not going to the toilet often enough or you might not feel as though you’re not fully emptying your bowels.

  • Unexplained weight loss

This is less common than some of the other symptoms. Speak to your GP if you have lost weight and you don’t know why. You may not feel like eating if you feel sick, bloated or if you just don’t feel hungry.

  • Extreme tiredness for no obvious reason

Bowel cancer may lead to a lack of iron in the body, which can cause anaemia (lack of red blood cells). If you have anaemia, you are likely to feel very tired and your skin may look pale.

  • A pain or lump in your tummy

You may have pain or a lump in your stomach area (abdomen) or back passage. See your GP if these symptoms don’t go away or if they’re affecting how you sleep or eat.

Most people with these symptoms don’t have bowel cancer, there are many other health problems that can cause similar symptoms such as piles, constipation, anal fissures or IBS.

If you have any symptoms, don’t be embarrassed and don’t ignore them – book an appointment with your GP.

For more information and advice visit Bowel Cancer UK.

EU Exit

On this page, you will find information that will help to explain how the NHS is preparing for the UK exiting the EU. 

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) is leading the response to EU Exit across the health and care sector and is working closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement to ensure that the NHS is best prepared.

What does this mean for me?

Supply of medicines & prescriptions

We have put contingency plans in place to ensure the continued supply of medicines and other medical products.

Please keep ordering your repeat prescriptions and taking your medicines as normal. It’s very important you don’t order more medicines than normal. If you do, then it may mean that other people won’t be able to get their medicines.

If you’re concerned speak to your pharmacist, GP or specialist.

You can read more about getting your medicines if there’s a no-deal EU Exit here:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/medicines-information/getting-your-medicines-if-theres-no-deal-eu-exit/

Goods and consumables

Along with our NHS Partners we have been closely monitoring the supply of non-clinical consumables, goods and services and you should still be able to find/order the same goods as you do now following the EU Exit.

EU Colleagues and European Qualifications

Across Cheshire the NHS is fortunate to have a number of colleagues who are EU nationals and Recruitment teams have been supporting with EU Settlement Scheme applications. You can find out more here. https://www.gov.uk/eusettledstatus

European qualifications that are currently recognised automatically by UK regulators (such as doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists and pharmacists) will continue to be recognised after the UK leaves the EU.

Healthcare abroad

The NHS.uk website is being regularly updated with information on the healthcare arrangements with individual countries. Please click here for further information (and check the relevant country guide if you are traveling to the EU after 31 October)

https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/healthcare-abroad/healthcare-when-travelling-abroad/travelling-in-the-european-economic-area-eea-and-switzerland/

 

To find out more

https://www.gov.uk/brexit

The EU Exit website contains detailed information on how individuals can prepare for the EU Exit, including if you have a business or are an EU national living in the UK.

This website now includes a simple ‘checker’ to find out what you may need to do to get ready for the EU Exit.

 

EU Exit advice for patients

We have heard from many of our patients with questions around their health and care as a consequence of an EU Exit.

The best source of information can be found on www.nhs.uk. This website will be updated on a regular basis.

Information for patients regarding medicines

Please keep ordering your repeat prescriptions and taking your medicines as normal. It’s very important you don’t order more medicines than normal. If you do, then it may mean that other people won’t be able to get their medicines.

Further information is available on www.NHS.uk

SOCIAL MEDIA ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY

Following recent activity on Facebook where patients of Weaverham Surgery posted derogatory comments about some of our staff, we now have the following policy in place.

If any such posts are brought to our attention we will contact the patients involved and invite them in to have a face to face discussion about the issues that they have. This will be viewed as a potential break down in the doctor – patient relationship and may result in you being removed from our list.

However, we would ask that rather than posting derogatory or hurtful comments about any of our staff on social media, or if there are any aspects of the service that you are not entirely happy with, please ask to speak to the practice manager about this or put your comments to us in writing giving us the opportunity to respond. We welcome all feedback, positive and negative as it gives us the opportunity to review the services that we provide and where necessary or appropriate, make any changes or improvements.

YOU WOULD NOT EXPECT TO READ DEROGATORY COMMENTS ABOUT YOURSELF AT YOUR OWN PLACE OF WORK, NOR DO WE.